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Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Happy Halloween!


Happy Halloween from Gardner & Billing CPAs! 
Come visit us next week for Halloween treats!

Broadus Trick-or-Treat Schedule


10:30am Storytime Trick-or-Treat
Preschooler trick-or-treat around the courthouse square 


3:30pm Trick-or-Treat for all ages
  Meet at the library
Preschoolers - 2nd grade go together as a group with adults
3rd grade and up receive a list of participating businesses 

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Estate Planning Workshop with Marsha Goetting


Marsha Goetting, MSU Extension Family Economics Specialist, will be presenting an Estate Planning Workshop on Monday, October 30th, at 1:00 p.m. at the Broadus Community Center.

Goetting will begin the workshop with effective methods of starting difficult conversations about estate allocation. Specific areas Goetting will cover include decisions about treatment of heirs and equal vs equitable; wills, trusts, probate, duties of the personal representative, joint tenancy transfer and transferring motor vehicles, power of attorney, basis in land, Montana Medical Care Savings Accounts, rights over your remains, letter of last instruction, common law marriage, and the Montana Endowment Tax Credit.


Marsha's video guide to estate planning in Montana, based on Montana’s state laws, is a lively, helpful video that everyone can understand! It has lots of helpful tips presented in a fun, memorable way. More information on Marsha and estate planning resources can be found at the MSU Extension website.


Biography
Marsha A. Goetting is a Professor and Extension Family Economics Specialist at Montana State University in Bozeman. She has presented over 800 workshops reaching over 25,000 Montanans with financial and estate planning information. She has also authored over 75 MontGuides and bulletins and has received national, regional, and state awards for her financial management and estate planning programs.

Educational Background

Dr. Goetting received her Bachelors and Masters degrees in Family Economics and Adult Education from Kansas State University and her Ph.D. from Iowa State University.

Professional Associations
  • Association for Financial Counseling and Planning Education
  • American Association of Family & Consumer Sciences
  • Montana Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences
  • Montana Gerontology Society
  • Montana Association of Family and Consumer Sciences


Wednesday, October 11, 2017

IRS Relief for Drought Stricken Ranchers


https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/drought-stricken-farmers-and-ranchers-have-more-time-to-replace-livestock-under-irs-relief

IR-2017-164, Sept. 27, 2017

WASHINGTON – Farmers and ranchers who previously were forced to sell livestock due to drought in an applicable region now have an additional year to replace the livestock and defer tax on any gains from the forced sales, according to the Internal Revenue Service. An applicable region is a county designated as eligible for federal assistance plus counties contiguous to that county.

This relief generally applies to capital gains realized by eligible farmers and ranchers on sales of livestock held for draft, dairy or breeding purposes. Sales of other livestock, such as those raised for slaughter or held for sporting purposes, or poultry are not eligible.

To qualify, the sales must be solely due to drought, flooding or other severe weather causing the region to be designated as eligible for federal assistance.

Under these circumstances, livestock generally must be replaced within a four-year period, instead of the usual two-year period. But in addition, the IRS is authorized to further extend this replacement period if the drought continues.

The one-year extension, announced today, gives eligible farmers and ranchers until the end of the tax year after the first drought-free year to replace the sold livestock. Details, including an example of how this provision works, can be found in Notice 2006-82, available on IRS.gov.

The IRS provides this extension to farmers and ranchers located in the applicable region that qualified for the four-year replacement period if any county, parish, city, or district, that is included in the applicable region is listed as suffering exceptional, extreme or severe drought conditions by the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC), during any weekly period between Sept. 1, 2016, and Aug. 31, 2017. All or part of 42 states, plus the District of Columbia, are listed.

As a result, farmers and ranchers in the applicable region whose drought sale replacement period was scheduled to expire at the end of this tax year, Dec. 31, 2017, in most cases, will now have until the end of their next tax year. Because the normal drought sale replacement period is four years, this extension immediately impacts drought sales that occurred during 2013. But because of previous drought-related extensions affecting some of these localities, the replacement periods for some drought sales before 2013 are also affected. Additional extensions will be granted if severe drought conditions persist.

Details on this relief, including a list of NDMC-designated counties, are in Notice 2017-53, posted on IRS.gov. More information on reporting drought sales and other farm-related tax issues can be found in Publication 225, Farmer’s Tax Guide, also available on the IRS web site.
 

Below is the listing of Montana and Wyoming Counties eligible:
Montana
Counties of Big Horn, Blaine, Broadwater, Carbon, Carter, Cascade, Chouteau, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Deer Lodge, Fallon, Fergus, Flathead, Gallatin, Garfield, Glacier, Golden Valley, Granite, Hill, Jefferson, Judith Basin, Lake, Lewis and Clark, Liberty, Lincoln, McCone, Meagher, Mineral, Missoula, Musselshell, Park, Petroleum, Phillips, Pondera, Powder River, Powell, Prairie, Ravalli, Richland, Roosevelt, Rosebud, Sanders, Sheridan, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Teton, Toole, Treasure, Valley, Wheatland, Wibaux, Yellowstone.

Wyoming

Counties of Big Horn, Campbell, Crook, Niobrara, Park, Sheridan, Teton, Weston.

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

IRS Taxpayer Guide to Identity Theft


For 2017, the IRS, the states and the tax industry joined together to enact new safeguards and take additional actions to combat tax-related identity theft. Many of these safeguards will be invisible to you, but invaluable to our fight against these criminal syndicates. If you prepare your own return with tax software, you will see new log-on standards. Some states also have taken additional steps. See your state revenue agency’s web site for additional details.

We also know identity theft is a frustrating process for victims. If you become a victim, we are committed to resolving your case as quickly as possible.

What is tax-related identity theft?

Tax-related identity theft occurs when someone uses your stolen Social Security number to file a tax return claiming a fraudulent refund.
You may be unaware that this has happened until you efile your return and discover that a return already has been filed using your SSN. Or, the IRS may send you a letter saying we have identified a suspicious return using your SSN.

Know the warning signs
Be alert to possible tax-related identity theft if you are contacted by the IRS or your tax professional/provider about:

  • More than one tax return was filed using your SSN.
  • You owe additional tax, refund offset or have had collection actions taken against you for a year you did not file a tax return.
  • IRS records indicate you received wages or other income from an employer for whom you did not work.
If you suspect you are a victim of identity theft, continue to pay your taxes and file your tax return, even if you must do so by paper.

Steps to take if you become a victim
If you are a victim of identity theft, the Federal Trade Commission recommends these steps:

  • File a complaint with the FTC at identitytheft.gov.
  • Contact one of the three major credit bureaus to place a ‘fraud alert’ on your credit records:
    • Equifax, www.Equifax.com, 800-525-6285
    • Experian, www.Experian.com, 888-397-3742
    • TransUnion, www.TransUnion.com, 800-680-7289
  • Contact your financial institutions, and close any financial or credit accounts opened without your permission or tampered with by identity thieves.
If your SSN is compromised and you know or suspect you are a victim of tax-related identity theft, the IRS recommends these additional steps:
  • Respond immediately to any IRS notice; call the number provided.
  • Complete IRS Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit, if your efiled return rejects because of a duplicate filing under your SSN or you are instructed to do so. Use a fillable form at IRS.gov, print, then attach the form to your return and mail according to instructions.
If you previously contacted the IRS and did not have a resolution, contact us for specialized assistance at 1-800-908-4490. We have teams available to assist.

How to reduce your risk
Join efforts by the IRS, states and tax industry to protect your data. Taxes. Security. Together. We all have a role to play. Here's how you can help:

  • Always use security software with firewall and anti-virus protections. Use strong passwords.
  • Learn to recognize and avoid phishing emails, threatening calls and texts from thieves posing as legitimate organizations such as your bank, credit card companies and even the IRS.
  • Do not click on links or download attachments from unknown or suspicious emails.
  • Protect your personal data. Don’t routinely carry your Social Security card, and make sure your tax records are secure.
See Publication 4524, Security Awareness for Taxpayers, to learn more.

The IRS does not initiate contact with taxpayers by email to request personal or financial information. This includes any type of electronic communication, such as text messages and social media channels.

Report suspicious online or emailed phishing scams to:phishing@irs.gov. For phishing scams by phone, fax or mail, call 1-800-366-4484. Report IRS impersonation scams to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration’s IRS Impersonation Scams Reporting.

See the main Identity Protection page for more information.